Friday, December 4, 2015

Speech to the Members of the Knesset and Happy Chanukah on Sunday

Rabbi Yehuda Lave

This Speech in Arabic in Israel's Knesset Really Caught all the Arab MKs off Guard. Israel belongs to the Jews according to the Koran

Just Keep Silent 

Sometimes we know that saying something will make a situation worse. We can tell ourselves to, "Just keep silent." If we feel tempted to speak negatively about someone, we can strengthen our resolve not to say it by telling ourselves, "Just keep silent."

The more difficult it is to keep silent, the greater the resulting spiritual elevation. When you tell yourself, "Just keep silent," your silence isn't just a passive state of being. Rather, it is an act of remaining silent.

In Tehillim (Psalms 34), King David tells us: "Who is the person who wants life and loves days that he may see good? Guard your tongue from evil and your lips from speaking deceit." Remaining silent instead of speaking against others enhances and lengthens life. It is of course easier to preach this than to practice it. I sat next to a woman yesterday who took up my seat as well as hers and she told me that I wasn't nice because she didn't have room.But I kept my mouth shut.

Love Yehuda Lave

Ever wonder what happens to all large items we throw away? Watch this!

Thanks to Israel, Travel Carry-on Will Never be the Same

Time for a little humor

> Teacher: How old is your father?

> Kid: He is 6 years.
> Teacher: What? How is this possible?
> Kid: He became father only when I was born.
> Logic!!
> Children Are Quick and Always Speak Their Minds _____________________
> TEACHER: Maria, go to the map and find North America.
> MARIA: Here it is.
> TEACHER: Correct. Now class, who discovered America ?
> CLASS: Maria.
> _____________________
> TEACHER: Glenn, how do you spell 'crocodile?'
> TEACHER: No, that's wrong
> GLENN: Maybe it is wrong, but you asked me how I spell it.
> (I Love this child)
> _____________________
> TEACHER: Donald, what is the chemical formula for water?
> TEACHER: What are you talking about?
> DONALD: Yesterday you said it's H to O
> ______________________
> TEACHER: Clyde , your composition on 'My Dog' is exactly the same
> as your brother's.. Did you copy his?
> CLYDE : No sir, It's the same dog.
> (I want to adopt this kid!!!)
> ___________________
> TEACHER: Harold, what do you call a person who keeps on talking
> when people are no longer interested?
> HAROLD: A teacher

You have to see what was just uncovered in Jerusalem!

         King Hezekiah's Seal
Photo Credit: Courtesy: Dr. Eilat Mazar. Photo: Uriah Tadmor

( The City of David excavations of the Jerusalem Hebrew University on Mount Ophel, at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount compound, have yielded a sensational discovery: a seal (bulla) with the name of King Hezekiah (727-698 BCE). This external evidence further establishes the veracity of the biblical account of the nation of Israel's empires going back some 3,000 years.

The seal is oval, with the dimensions of 8.6 by 9.7 mm, impressed on soft clay (Bulla) of 12 by 13 mm, about three millimeters thick. The bulla was used originally to sign a document written on papyrus and kept rolled and tied with thin twine whose subtle marks can be seen on the back of the bulla. The seal was discovered along with many pottery shards and various figurines and seals.

King Hezekiah's bulla was discovered in a garbage heap that was dumped during or shortly after Hezekiah's time, from a royal building that was used to store food. This building is part of a series of buildings, including a gate and towers, which were built in the second half of the tenth century BCE (the time of King Solomon), as part of the Ophel fortifications of the new government complex that connected the city of David with the Temple Mount.

Another imprinted 33 seals were unearthed along with the bulla, some of them bearing Hebrew names, marked in their backs by coarse canvas and thick wires, which apparently were used to seal sacks containing food products. Each seal is surrounded by a sunken border left by the seal's frame. The Hezekiah seal bears the inscription: "Hezekiah (son) Ahaz King of Judea," with an emblem of the sun emblem with tilted down wings and two icons of the Ankh (symbol of life).

According to Dr. Eilat Mazar, "despite the fact that seals bearing Hezekiah's name have been seen on the antiques market since the 1990s, some with the symbol of a winged scarab (dung beetle) and some with a winged sun symbol, this is the first time that a seal of a King of Israel or Judea was found in a scientific archaeological excavation."

The discovery of a royal seal at the Ophel archaeological excavations brings to life in a direct way the biblical stories about King Hezekiah and the national affairs that took place in his days in the Royal Borough of Jerusalem.

The seal was discovered via a process of wet sifting of the layers of soil from the excavation, which was conducted at the sifting facility at Tsurim Valley, run by Dr. Gabi Barkai and Tzachi Dvira and sponsored by the Israel Nature and Parks Authority and the City of David Fund. The seal was found by Efrat Greenwald, a member of the Ophel team who was responsible for screening the excavation soil. Reut Ben-Arie, who prepared the Hebrew bullas from the Ophel excavations, was first to recognize that the seal belonged to King Hezekiah.

King Hezekiah's Seal

Weizmann Institute Study: Blood Sugar Levels in Response to Foods Are Highly Individual

Sugar Study

Photo Credit: cellvideoabstracts

( Which is more likely to raise blood sugar levels: sushi or ice cream? According to a Weizmann Institute study reported in the November 19 issue of the journal Cell, the answer varies from one person to another. The study, which continuously monitored blood sugar levels in 800 people for a week, revealed that the bodily response to all foods was highly individual.

The study, called the Personalized Nutrition Project (, was conducted by the groups of Prof. Eran Segal of the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department and Dr. Eran Elinav of the Immunology Department. Segal said: "We chose to focus on blood sugar because elevated levels are a major risk factor for diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome. The huge differences that we found in the rise of blood sugar levels among different people who consumed identical meals highlights why personalized eating choices are more likely to help people stay healthy than universal dietary advice."

Indeed, the scientists found that different people responded very differently to both simple and to complex meals. For example, a large number of the participants' blood sugar levels rose sharply after they consumed a standardized glucose meal, but in many others, blood glucose levels rose sharply after they ate white bread, but not after glucose. Elinav: "Our aim in this study was to find factors that underlie personalized blood glucose responses to food. We used that information to develop personal dietary recommendations that can help prevent and treat obesity and diabetes, which are among the most severe epidemics in human history."

David Zeevi and Tal Korem, PhD students in Segal's lab, led the study. They collaborated with Dr. Niv Zmora, a physician conducting PhD studies in Elinav's lab, and with PhD student Daphna Rothschild and research associate Dr. Adina Weinberger from Segal's lab. The study was unique in its scale and in the inclusion of the analysis of gut microbes, collectively known as the microbiome, which had recently been shown to play an important role in human health and disease. Study participants were outfitted with small monitors that continuously measured their blood sugar levels. They were asked to record everything they ate, as well as such lifestyle factors as sleep and physical activity. Overall, the researchers assessed the response of different people to more than 46,000 meals.

Taking these multiple factors into account, the scientists generated an algorithm for predicting individualized response to food based on the person's lifestyle, medical background, and the composition and function of his or her microbiome. In a follow-up study of another 100 volunteers, the algorithm successfully predicted the rise in blood sugar in response to different foods, demonstrating that it could be applied to new participants. The scientists were able to show that lifestyle also mattered. The same food affected blood sugar levels differently in the same person, depending, for example, on whether its consumption had been preceded by exercise or sleep.

In the final stage of the study, the scientists designed a dietary intervention based on their algorithm; this was a test of their ability to prescribe personal dietary recommendations for lowering blood glucose level responses to food. Volunteers were assigned a personalized "good" diet for one week, and a "bad" diet – also personalized – for another. Both good and bad diets were designed to have the same number of calories, but they differed between participants. Thus, certain foods in one person's "good" diet were part of another's "bad" diet. The "good" diets indeed helped to keep blood sugar at steadily healthy levels, whereas the "bad" diets often induced spikes in glucose levels —all within just one week of intervention. Moreover, as a result of the "good" diets, the volunteers experienced consistent changes in the composition of their gut microbes, suggesting that the microbiome may be influenced by the personalized diets while also playing a role in participants' blood sugar responses.

The scientists are currently enrolling Israeli volunteers for a longer-term follow-up dietary intervention study that will focus on people with consistently high blood sugar levels, who are at risk of developing diabetes, with the aim of preventing or delaying this disease. To learn more, please visit

Strikingly different responses to identical foods. In study participant 445 (top), blood sugar levels rose sharply after eating bananas but not after cookies of the same amount of calories. The opposite occurred in participant 644 (bottom)

Strikingly different responses to identical foods. In study participant 445 (top), blood sugar levels rose sharply after eating bananas but not after cookies of the same amount of calories. The opposite occurred in participant 644 (bottom).